Poetry for grief and healing

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https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=126282089&t=1558608220178

Extract:

Early in the collection, Young includes a poem, “Funeral Blues” by W.H. Auden, that was read at his father’s service. It begins:

Stop all the clocks, cut off the telephone,
Prevent the dog from barking with a juicy bone,
Silence the pianos and with muffled drum
Bring out the coffin, let the mourners come

Let aeroplanes circle moaning overhead
Scribbling on the sky the message He is Dead.

It’s that ability — to express a feeling like the one that arrives quickly after the loss of a loved one — that poems like Auden’s wield.

“I think that’s a real part of grief that we sometimes aren’t able to talk about and I think that poetry talks about perhaps better than anything else,” Young tells NPR’s Renee Montange. “It’s able capture a moment, a feeling, perhaps a fleeting feeling, and even make — as that poem does — music out of it.”

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About Katherine

I like art, poetry,history, literature,cooking,doing nothing to music.And conversation
This entry was posted in Thinkings and poems. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Poetry for grief and healing

  1. Can so relate to this Katherine. I began writing poetry on a daily basis after losing my Dad in December 2016 and haven’t stopped since. Thank goodness for poetry! Thanks for sharing! I am a Creative Life Coach with a poetry blog and here is one of my recent poems about an umbrella that reminded me of a day with Dad…

    https://peacockpoetryblog.wordpress.com/2019/05/24/confetti-from-the-sky/

    I am also on Instagram as #coachingcreatively, let’s follow each other if you use this medium? You can also find me on Facebook under Sam Allen wearing a bright red and orange hat!

    I love connecting with fellow creatives as you can see!

    Sunny greetings from Switzerland!

    Sam 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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